Building a CNC machine from ordinary items.

Anything else around the house.
Jarod
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Re: Building a CNC machine from ordinary items.

Post by Jarod » Sun Dec 04, 2011 9:28 pm

Well my power supply is rated for 12a at 5v, 1.5a at 12v and 0.2a at 24v
it may not be consuming nearly 12a, I've had them running for several minutes and they don't even get hot, and the chip is cool to the touch too.

foxmiles
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Re: Building a CNC machine from ordinary items.

Post by foxmiles » Mon Dec 05, 2011 12:11 am

Ah, I was thinking "Wow, that's a lot of heat!" (60 Watts). Probably much lower.
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Re: Building a CNC machine from ordinary items.

Post by Jarod » Mon Dec 05, 2011 3:09 am

Here's the progress so far.

I've eliminated the box section on the underside of the tables and am now only using that for the guide rails on the top of the frame and X table, I'm now using angle iron for the guides on the bottom of the tables.


I've got the Y stepper mounted, and thanks to the angle iron smoothing out the table action so much I think i could get away with an even smaller stepper motor than the ones I've got.
Attachments
IMG_20111204_215750.jpg
With angle iron (cant see it in photo) and Stepper mounted
IMG_20111202_080750.jpg
X and Y axis before the angle iron re-do
IMG_20111202_080715.jpg
aluminum box section with really long nutty thing inside

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Re: Building a CNC machine from ordinary items.

Post by Jarod » Mon Dec 05, 2011 11:53 pm

Making good progress now!
Got motors attached, and hooked up to the threaded rods. I'm wishing I had a drill press right now as the slightly crooked threaded nut holder thingys really make it hard to turn the lead screws, which means I need a ton more power out of my steppers to run the machine.

I'm possibly going to try making new ones with the little weird drill press I have or alternately go steal Jonathon's drill press. (Actually I'd just use it to make the pieces. he said i could use it whenever I want)


The computer will be driving the steppers with a uln2803 clone via parallel port.
And I'll be using EMC2 (http://www.linuxcnc.org/) to control it.
I'll be adjusting the Z axis manually at least for now.
The main goal getting this working is to start doing some PCB routing.

I'm going to have to get some copper clad pcb, I can get between 20 and 30 boards varying in size (all bigger than 2.5" x 4" ) for around 12 bucks shipped but I'm thinking I should get some single sided and some double sided so that I can do a little of both, and that'd probably cost me around 40 bucks to have around 30 double sided and around 120 single sided boards.
Attachments
IMG_20111205_171022.jpg
Motors mounted, attached to threaded rod.
IMG_20111205_171048.jpg
And here is our EMC2 box, knew I didn't throw out those 1.8ghz machines for a reason

foxmiles
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Re: Building a CNC machine from ordinary items.

Post by foxmiles » Tue Dec 06, 2011 1:38 am

Cool, will the steppers you have operate it?

I've been thinking about my Reprap idea, the more I think about my intended use (pcb milling) the less I think it will work. I love the idea and looks of the machines, but have serious questions about the rigidity of the frame, the belt drive, and the various plastic parts. I can weld, so an angle iron frame with threaded rod drive keeps sounds better.

My new specs:
1. Mostly bolted together for initial alignment, then mostly welded.
2. Folding or removable vertical piece (should fold mostly flat for storage/ transport)
3. preferably direct drive threaded rods, no stretching under heavy loads
4. Sufficient to accurately mill PCB's and possibly aluminum.
5. Some sort of swappable head system to allow milling, extrusion, and other things
6. Controlled via USB, because that's what I have available.

To be determined:
Aluminum or steel frame. I'd really like aluminum, but can't weld it with the MIG currently. Gas is an option though...
Digging with a spoon will accomplish more than leaning on a shovel.

Jarod
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Re: Building a CNC machine from ordinary items.

Post by Jarod » Tue Dec 06, 2011 3:02 am

Sadly no, the steppers I have will not run it :(

I'm thinking of attempting gear reduction or something, bigger stepper motors are expensive, total cost is getting close to $100 as of right now and I don't want to push that much further.

I would like to get it working well enough to build a better controller and then start producing either parts to build a cnc machine/reprap or pcbs/controllers and sell them to recoup some of the money I've put into this little thing.

foxmiles
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Re: Building a CNC machine from ordinary items.

Post by foxmiles » Thu Dec 15, 2011 1:38 am

OK, Just finished up the Sanguinololu build. I'll add information as I get time, I'll consolidate it into a blog post when complete.

The FTDI Chip installed:
DSCI0109.JPG
FTDI Chip installed
The USB Connector, related parts:
DSCI0111.JPG
USB Related Hardware
The pololu headers, components:
DSCI0114.JPG
Pololu Headers Installed
Stopped taking Pictures and got busy at this point, the pololu drivers hadn't yet arrived.

Completed board without Pololu Drivers:
DSCI0122.JPG
Completed Board, Less Drivers
The Pololu Driver:
DSCI0123.JPG
Pololu Driver
DSCI0123.JPG (81.3 KiB) Viewed 4882 times
Finally the completed Board:
DSCI0118.JPG
Finished Board, Complete with drivers
Digging with a spoon will accomplish more than leaning on a shovel.

Jarod
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Re: Building a CNC machine from ordinary items.

Post by Jarod » Thu Dec 15, 2011 5:59 pm

I've got X and Y axis working, motors mounted, everything smoothed up, and even my drive nuts redone with an Electric based Metal Joining Device (Welder)

I've lubed up the rails and got everything working quite nicely, I'm still working on the Z axis but it is coming along slowly.
Attachments
IMG_20111215_123154.jpg
IMG_20111215_123138.jpg

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Re: Building a CNC machine from ordinary items.

Post by Jarod » Tue Jan 24, 2012 4:10 am

So, now that we have the Sanguinololu working after a bad fusebit setting (See here) I've got the machine mostly working, need to calibrate it, then test it out.

I've fought with Eagle and PCB-Gcode to get them cooperating and now it works, i get gcode with proper z axis movements.

A tool that proved invaluable in this was tkCNC, its a paid program but it does a 3d simulation of gcode, nothing else I've found will do that.

now I just have to see if the gcode will play nicely with the reprap/repetier software or if i'll have to figure out how to get EMC2 working with a sanguinololu.
Attachments
emu.jpg
Simulation of pcb build

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Re: Building a CNC machine from ordinary items.

Post by Jarod » Sun Feb 12, 2012 6:59 pm

Update on recent happenings with the cnc machine.

Last thing that happened was I blew up a ftdi chip (still dont know how)

one new chip later and we're at today.
I think I've found the reason for the z axis being buggy, repetier host has a travel speed setting and so does the gcode and so does sprinter. i've dropped all the travel speeds to 100mm/min in all 3 locations.

and then after plugging it back into the computer i clicked connect and it refused to do anything. I disconnected and reconnected and it said "File not found"....


not another ftdi chip blown up?!
nope. works fine on my desktop upstairs. I'm wondering if that 1.8ghz pc doesn't put out enough voltage to the usb or puts out too much or something.
I'm going to get repetier set up on the laptop and do that.


While the Z axis wasn't working I ran a little PCB mill job through it, it seems like the z axis is way too wobbly to work, it moves the x and y around and the z just bends and the tool stays in the same place.

So that's next on the list.

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